In the U.S. 2,000 healthcare workers a year become infected with hepatitis C, and 400 contract hepatitis B because of needlestick transmission.

The Q STAT Safety Syringe can make a difference.

CE certification

ISO 13485 Certified

The 1ml, 3ml, 5ml and 10ml Q STAT retractable safety syringes all have CE certification and meet EU safety, health and environmental requirements.

Safety Syringe Design Comparison

There are currently four general designs of safety syringes.

1. SPRING RETRACTABLE SYRINGES

The Q STAT Safety Syringe has significant design features that make it the most effective and safe spring retractable syringe.

The Q STAT Safety Syringe works in the same way as a traditional syringe. The luer lock allows for easy change of needles and selection of the appropriate needle for each procedure. The safety technology is passive. It is the only user-controlled automatic retraction syringe available today.

2. SHEATHING TUBE SYRINGES

  • Require two hands to operate.
  • Require a second hand moving closer to the needle to activate.
  • Harder to read the scales because of the sheath.
  • Many reported problems of being able to reliably engage the safety mechanisms.
  • Must retract from the injection site, exposing the needle before actuation.
  • Take up more room in expensive sharps containers.
  • Trials of one design actually increased needlesticks at Kaiser Permanente.
  • Some require a second operation in order to lock it in place. The same old problem with a new twist.

3. SLIDING NEEDLE COVERS

  • Require a grip change.
  • Safety feature actuation requires a thumb or finger in closer proximity to the needle.
  • Must retract from the injection site, exposing the needle before actuation.
  • Kaiser’s use of one model failed to reduce needle sticks during one year of wide-spread use.

4. HINGED NEEDLE COVERS

  • Necessitate reaching next to the needle to move the cover out of the way in order to give an injection.
  • Require a grip change to operate a safety feature.
  • Puts at least one finger in close proximity to the needle after the injection.
  • Must retract from the injection site, exposing the needle before actuation.
  • Cumbersome to use.
  • Flipping motion as the needle snaps into the cover can cause blood splatter.